FORREST FENN QUOTES ON STAYING SAFE

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3965 unkonwn Click Here
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N/A - Consolidated quotes appearing throughout the article. the treasure is where an elderly man put it so I suppose your kids would be in a safe place if they found it. F

ID # Date Link
6212 8/11/2016 Click Here
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What advice would you give people searching for the treasure when it comes to safety? Anyone who goes into the mountains should be prepared, use a GPS and always be aware of possible dangers.

ID # Date Link
6233 8/11/2016 Click Here
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What equipment should they have? It's easy to get turned around in the forest and lose your bearings. One should have plenty of water, warm clothes and a GPS.

ID # Date Link
6331 6/29/2017 Click Here
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N/A - Consolidated quotes appearing throughout the article. When I said the treasure was not hidden in Utah or Idaho it was my plan not to narrow the search area further. But in the light of a recent accident, and in the interest of safety, I feel it necessary to alter that plan. The treasure chest is not under water, nor is it near the Rio Grande River. It is not necessary to move large rocks or climb up or down a steep precipice, and it is not under a man-made object. Please remember that I was about 80 when I made two trips from my vehicle to where I hid the treasure. Please be cautious and don’t take risks. My guess is that in the last 7 years more than 250,000 people have searched for the treasure without suffering any serious injuries. I invite you to add your name to that list. The search is supposed to be fun. f

ID # Date Link
6324 6/27/2017 Click Here
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N/A - Consolidated quotes appearing throughout the article. I think the e-mail that helped me make a decision was the one from a man who was contemplating suicide, and then he heard about the treasure chest and his life was turned around... It is tragic that Randy was lost, and I am especially sorry for his two grown daughters...Anyone who goes into the mountains should be prepared, use a GPS and always be aware of possible dangers. Many people don’t have experience hiking in the mountains, but that doesn’t mean they should stay at home. Just be careful and don’t get overextended... I have to respect what the chief said... caused me to stop and think for a few days... after a long deliberation and discussions with friends, I have decided that stopping the search would not be fair to the thousands who have searched the Rockies and gone home with wonderful memories that will last them forever. A number of family members who have been estranged for years have reunited to join in the search... I will not stop the searching, but we are working with the state police and the search and rescue people to make it safer to hike the mountains... There is no way to prevent accidents. An average of nine people lose their lives each year at the Grand Canyon.... No one knows the dangers that lurk in the mountains more than those living in Colorado. It is important to observe the rules made by rangers and Forest Service personnel, and I am sure that subject is constantly being emphasized in your social media... a hard decision for me... the decision has been made.

ID # Date Link
6653 3/14/2016 Click Here
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N/A - Consolidated quotes appearing throughout the article. If I die tomorrow, the knowledge of that location goes in the coffin with me… That's the kind of email that I don't respond to. Because if you want me to give you a clue I'm not going to answer your email... I love antiques, particularly American Indian… Sure, I'm eccentric. I pride myself on being eccentric. I don't want to go down the center line like a lot of people do... We don't want to get anybody else lost. Be prepared. Take a GPS. Take at least one other person with you. And wait [until] the snow and the ice melts.

ID # Date Link
6338 6/16/2017 Click Here
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I am reading that several people have been lost while looking for your treasure. On Monday we will go on our first search and we are a little apprehensive. Since you are the only one who knows where it is hidden can you give me some advice that will help keep us safe? Mrs SRM and son. Yes Mrs. M, your email is timely, and because you are new to the search I will reiterate what has been said many times on blogs and in the media. If you plan to search in a National Forest or a National Park you should ask a ranger to brief you on your particular area. They can advise you much better than I can.

It is easier to get lost or stranded in the winter time because the weather is such a factor. But the spring and summer conditions can be just as unforgiving if you are not prepared.

Please don’t ever overextend yourself. I was 80 or about when I hid the treasure and it was not a difficult task. I will soon be 87 and I could go back and get it if I were so inclined, I think.

If you or your son have any physical limitations please don’t attempt the search. Many flatlanders suffer altitude sickness in the Rockies.

Don’t go into the mountains alone. Two searchers together is an absolute minimum, but three or even four is better. Stay within eyesight of each other. A whistle can be valuable if you get separated.

Food, water, proper clothing, matches, bug spray, and a GPS are requirements. Cell phone service is not available in many mountain locations, but take one anyway. If you do have service check in with a friend at home several times a day, and give them a GPS location. They should know where and when you started your search and when you expect to return.

Wearing waders in fast moving water is dangerous, especially if you don’t have the chest type with a tight belt around your chest that will keep most of the water out if you should fall. The rocks in most moving water are slippery and falling is easy. Your waders should have felt soles and not rubber. Don’t take chances, and remember that in many cases no can be a better answer than yes.

You don’t have to move big rocks, or scale a precipice to get to the treasure. Stay away from dangerous terrain.

The summer sun can sap your strength so it is best to wear long sleeves, long pants, and always a hat, especially in New Mexico. At the first sign of fatigue, turn back. If you are not camping plan to be out of the mountains before dark. If your solve is in the desert, get a new solve, and remember, much of the Rio Grande River is not in the Rocky Mountains.

Generally, black bears are not a problem, and they normally will run at first sight. The grizzly can be a problem but rarely is. If you are hiking, use your whistle so as to not surprise him. If you see cubs quickly move away. It is not a good idea to make eye contact with any dangerous animal because they may see it as a threat. Use bear spray only as a last resort.

Caution and common sense are your best weapons in the mountains. Hope this helps Mrs. M, but you should also do your own research. f


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